Co-Chairs & Panel Members


David Tom Cooke, M.D., FACS

Task Force Chair, Comprehensive Lung Cancer Screening Program

Head, Section of General Thoracic Surgery, UC Davis Health

Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery, University of California, Davis

David Tom Cooke is an associate professor at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, UC Davis Health. He is the section head of General Thoracic Surgery, the Task-Force chair and founder of the UC Davis Comprehensive Lung Cancer Screening Program, and program director of the UC Davis Cardiothoracic Surgery Residency. Dr. Cooke specializes in the surgical treatment of malignant and benign lung and esophageal disease and minimally invasive thoracic surgery. Dr. Cooke completed his cardiothoracic surgery training at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor; general surgery residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School; medical school at Harvard; and undergraduate degree at UC Berkeley

Dr. Cooke’s research includes oncologic trials, surgical outcomes/health services research, patient-centered outcomes research, surgical education, medical social media and public medical communication, and has received research funding from the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute. He has authored over 50 scholarly manuscripts and text-book chapters and co-authored a book.

He is the co-founder of #LCSMChat, the bi-monthly lung cancer, patient-centered social media Twitter chat and patient engagement network. Since its inception in 2013, the #LCSM community has had over 25,000 participants, 239,000 tweets and 729 million impressions.

UC Davis Health

UC Davis Health is an academic health system that is part of the University of California, Davis (UC Davis).

Program Structure

Hybrid program Decentralized ordering/ centralized tracking

Program Governance Structure

Multidisciplinary team
Led by Radiology

Type of Tracking System

EMR-based registry, ACR Registry

Unique Population Served by Program

Rural
Minority Representation
Multiple minority populations